The Great State of Oklahoma

 

Open your eyes to this map and travel roads leading to attractions around the southeast part of the state. Oklahoma's State Parks and the National Forest offer hiking, camping, biking, and a variety of outdoor activities in unspoiled, uncrowded settings. As you travel through the lush, pine-covered Ouachita Mountains of the southeast, some of the friendiest people in America will guide you along the way through Oklahoma - Native America.

The only thing hard about planning a vacation or weekend to Eastern Oklahoma is choosing among all the possibilities. You could hike along the Ouachita Trail, ride horseback at the Winding Stair Mountains, or drive the Talimena Scenic Drive. Big-city thrills await you in Tulsa and Oklahoma City, where four-star restaurants, zoos, museums, parks and cultural events bid for your attention. Or you could slow down and browse your way through southeast Oklahoma's charming towns.

 

Many of Oklahoma's 52 state parks are located in the southeast and offer a wide range of landscapes to escape to; from pine covered mountains, to uncrowded lakes and rivers that offer unlimited ways to have fun on (and in) the water. Please browse through this "US Forest Service in Oklahoma" web site throughly. There is a wealth of information available here to begin the planning your vacation may need and to showcase the natural, cultural, and recreational resources waiting for you.

Once you know which of Eastern Oklahoma's attractions you want to visit first, you're ready for what comes easy:

Having a wonderful time in Oklahoma.

 

Oklahoma Flag
Facts & Figures


 

Entered The Union: Nov. 16, 1907; the 46th State
Population: 3,258,000
Capital: Oklahoma City
Area: 69,919 square miles (18th in size in the
United States)
State Fair: at Oklahoma City; the last week of Sept.

 

Cities:
Oklahoma City 463,201 residents
Tulsa 374,851 residents
Norman 87,290 residents
Lawton 86,028 residents

 

Highest Point: Black Mesa in the Panhandle (4,973 feet)
Lowest Point: East of Idabel (287 feet)

 

Oklahoma: Abbr. OK, Okla. A state of the south-central United States. It was admitted as the 46th state in 1907. First explored by the Spanish, it was opened to settlement in 1889. The western part was organized in 1890 as the Oklahoma Territory, which was merged with the adjoining Indian Terriotry to form the present state boundaries. Oklahoma City is the capital and the largest city. Population, 3,157,604.

Geography: Oklahoma has more man-made lakes than any other state, with over one million surface acres of water. Oklahoma's four mountain ranges include the Ouachitas, Arbuckles, Witchitas and Kiamichis. Forests cover approximately 24% of Oklahoma.

Products: Oklahoma ranks fourth in the nation in the production of wheat; fourth in cattle and calf production; fifth in the production of pecans; sixth in the production of peanuts and eighth in peaches.

Name: The name OKLAHOMA comes from the Choctaw words OKLA, meaning people, and HUMMA, meaning red. The name literally means "red people."

Native America: Oklahoma has the largest Native American population of any other state. Many of the 250,000 American Indians living in the state are descended from 67 tribes who inhabited Indian Territory. tribal headquarters for 39 tribes are in Oklahoma.

Time Zones: Oklahoma is on Central Standard Time from the last Sunday in October until the first Sunday in April (otherwise it is on Daylight Savings Time). The exception is the Kenton area in the Panhandle; it is on Mountain Standard Time.

History: Part of the Louisiana Purchase, 1803, Oklahoma was known as Indian Territory (but was not given territorial government) after it became the home of the "Five Civilized Tribes" --Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole -- 1828-1846. The land was also used by Comanche, Osage, and other Plains Indians. As white settlers pressed west, land was opened for homesteading by runs and lottery, the first run taking place April 22, 1889. The most famous run was to the Cherokee Outlet, 1893, with remaining land of the Indian Territory made available in 1906 to white settlers.

By the 1890's Oklahoma had become a major oil-producing state. During the great depression, northwest Oklahoma was part of the dust bowl, and thousands of farmers were forced to leave their lands to become migrant laborers. The economy was revitalized during World War II, and for decades energy-related industries maintained Oklahoma's position as one of the fastest-growing sunbelt states. Beginning in the mid-1980's, however, the states economy was hurt (as it had been in the 1930's) by its dependence on the oil industry.

 

Oklahoma Flag
Symbols

Nickname: The Sooner State
State Flower: Mistletoe
State Tree: The Redbud Tree
State Rock: Barite Rose Rock
State Bird: Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
State Animal: Bison
State Wildflower: Indian Blanket
State Instrument: The Fiddle
State Song: OKLAHOMA!
State Fish: The White Bass
State Motto: "Labor Omnia Vincit,"
(Labor Conquers All Things)
State Reptile: The Mountain Boomer

 

Oklahoma Flag
Resources For More Information

Traveling
Overnight Accommodiations: 800-652-6552
Highway Patrol/Emergency: 405-825-2323
Celular Phone *55
Road & Weather Conditions:
Oklahoma
405-425-2385
Road & Weather Conditions:
Arkansas
501-569-2374
Turnpike Tolls & Access: 800-745-3727
In OK City 405-755-8655
Oklahoma Department of Transportation: 405-521-2541

 


Cultural/Recreation

Oklahoma Tourist Information: 800-652-6552
in OK City 405-521-2409
Oklahoma Resort Parks & Cabins: 800-654-8240
Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation: 405-521-3851
Fishing Information: 800-ASK-FISH
800-275-3474
Hunting Information: 405-521-2739
Oklahoma Scenic Rivers Commission: 918-456-3251
Oklahoma Arts Council: 405-521-2931
Oklahoma Historical Society: 405-521-2491
Oklahoma Museums Association: 405-424-7757
Oklahoma Community Theater Association: 405-236-0788
Oklahoma Restaurant Association: 405-942-8181

 


Government: State of Oklahoma

State Senator's Office,
Eastern Oklahoma:
Kenneth Corn, District 4,
State Capitol Building
State Senate Chamber
North Lincoln Boulevard
Oklahoma City, OK 73105
Phone: 405-524-0126
FAX: 405-521-5507
State Senator's Office,
Southeast Oklahoma:
Jack Bell, District 5,
State Capitol Building
State Senate Chamber
North Lincoln Boulevard
Oklahoma City, OK 73105
Phone: 405-524-0126
FAX: 405-521-5507
State Representative's Office,
Southeast Oklahoma:
Terry Matlock, District 1,
State Capitol Building
State House Chamber
North Lincoln Boulevard
Oklahoma City, OK 73105
Phone: 405-521-2711,
FAX: 405-557-7351
State Representative's Office,
Eastern Oklahoma:
District 3,
State Capitol Building
State House Chamber
North Lincoln Boulevard
Oklahoma City, OK 73105
Phone: 405-521-2711,
FAX: 405-557-7351
Governor's Office: Brad Henry, Governor,
State of Oklahoma
State Capitol Bldg., Rm. 212
Oklahoma City, OK 73105
Direct Line: 405-521-2342,
FAX: 405-521-3353
  Mary Fallin, Lt. Governor,
State of Oklahoma
State Capitol Bldg., Rm. 211
Oklahoma City, OK 73105
Direct Line: 405-521-2161,
FAX: 405-525-2702
Accessibility Concerns Office:   405-521-3756